Advocates for Atrial Fibrillation Needed

Atrial Fibrillation pic
Atrial Fibrillation
Image: webmd.com

Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, is a practicing cardiologist and professor of medicine at Stanford University in California. In his previous role as professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Dr. Sanjiv Narayan developed new mapping techniques for atrial fibrillation and an innovative therapy used to treat the condition, known as map based – driver ablation for AF (one example is Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation, FIRM)..

Atrial fibrillation (known as AF or afib) is a common heart rhythm condition characterized by heart palpitations, shortness of breath, and dizziness. Stopafib.org, an educational website for families and patients affected by AF, is currently seeking atrial fibrillation advocates for participation in a research-advocacy training program. Sponsored by The Alliance for Aging Research’s Senior Patient & Family Caregiver Network (SP&FCN), this program will provide participants with training to become merit reviewers for organizations including the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the National Institutes of Health, sit on research-related committees, and even partner with existing researchers to disseminate and design research.

A 2-day, in-person workshop will take place in Dallas, Texas, from November 19-21, 2019. Selected participants will be reimbursed for travel expenses and provided with a 2-night stay in a local hotel. Previous participants in this program have gone on to become research advocates with organizations such as The American Heart Association, The Food and Drug Administration, and the Alzheimer’s Associations’ Early Stage Support Group National Team, among others.

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Researching Improvements in Ablation Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation

Ablation
Image: webmd.com

Sanjiv M. Narayan, MD, PhD, is a cardiologist who serves as a professor of medicine and the director of the Stanford Arrhythmia Center at Stanford University. Throughout his career, Dr. Sanjiv Narayan has been a part of numerous research teams that study various aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation.

Dr. Narayan and his team recently conducted a study titled, “Secular trends in the success rate of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: The SMASH-AF cohort,” with the purpose of examining the evolution of ablation techniques for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Ablation is the scarring or destruction of heart tissue that sends the abnormal electrical signals that cause atrial fibrillation.

Researchers examined more than 16 years of records (180 studies total) in several public databases. The researchers found that, overall, improvements in ablation techniques for atrial fibrillation have been small but steady. Researchers say these findings indicate that major breakthroughs in atrial fibrillation treatment may have to come from advances in technology or from new ways of thinking about mechanisms of AF in addition to the pulmonary veins.

Domestic and Global Atrial Fibrillation Market to Keep Growing

Atrial Flutter pic
Atrial Fibrillation
Image: webmd.com

For more than two decades, Sanjiv M. Narayan, MD, PhD, has been working in the medical field. With postdoctoral training in neurology, electrophysiology, and cardiology, Dr. Sanjiv M. Narayan has spent much of his career serving as a cardiologist and teaching cardiology topics at schools such as Stanford University and UC San Diego. Dr. Narayan is particularly interested in atrial fibrillation, a major health problem around the world.

According to a report from Global Market Insights, the atrial fibrillation market in the United States is the largest in the world. By 2025, the market is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate of nearly 14 percent.

Experts expect this growth to occur steadily over the forecast period because of the adoption of modern healthcare infrastructure in the US along with an increasing number of new devices that address atrial fibrillation and the growing US geriatric population. Global Market Insights also noted that the global atrial fibrillation market will also increase for many of the same reasons. The global market is expected to surpass $12.5 billion by 2025.

What You Need to Know About Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Risk

Sanjiv Narayan Abbott pic
Sanjiv Narayan

As co-founder and co-director of the Stanford Arrhythmia Center, cardiologist Sanjiv M. Narayan, MD, Ph.D., works to develop world-class therapies for heart rhythm disorders like atrial fibrillation (Afib). Formerly a professor at the University of California, San Diego, Dr. Sanjiv Narayan’s most important achievements include the development of a new cardiac ablation treatment called Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation (FIRM), which allows cardiac surgeons to eliminate disruptive heart tissue with greater precision and efficiency.

One of the main reasons cardiologists are concerned with finding a permanent treatment for Afib is that people with this type of arrhythmia are five times more likely to experience a stroke. Resulting from a blocked or burst blood vessel in the brain, a stroke can have effects ranging from severe, permanent damage to the brain to death. Other important facts to know about Afib and strokes include:

1. Each year, about 700,000 Americans have a stroke. Of these, about 15-20% are due to Afib.

2. Roughly 35% of people with Afib will experience a stroke over their lifetime.

3. Afib risk increases with age, doubling every decade after the age of 55.

4. Women account for 61% of stroke deaths in the US, and they are at higher risk of death from Afib than men.

2017 Article Identifies Rotating Waves during Atrial Fibrillation

 

Atrial Flutter pic
Atrial Fibrillation
Image: webmd.com

Stanford University professor Dr. Sanjiv M. Narayan is an expert in atrial fibrillation (AF), a medical condition defined by an irregular and often accelerated heartbeat. One of Dr. Sanjiv Narayan’s recent studies on the topic appeared in the June 2017 issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

Entitled “Two Independent Mapping Techniques Identify Rotational Activity Patterns at Sites of Local Termination during Persistent Atrial Fibrillation,” the study addressed uncertainties in the general medical understanding of AF that arise as the result of inconsistent mapping techniques. It accomplished this by comparing two independent AF mapping techniques that measured results in the same patients.

The first study of its kind to use more than one AF mapping method, it identified stable rotational activation at specific sites in the heart that drove AF for multiple cycles. Both mapping methods confirmed these results. Researchers developed a new computer program to chart their findings and subsequently released this program for free on the Internet.

Atrial Fibrillation Study Builds on Mapping of Rotors, Focal Drivers

Sanjiv Narayan Abbott pic
Sanjiv Narayan

A professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University, Dr. Sanjiv M. Narayan is working to develop the Stanford Arrhythmia Center, which focuses on creating innovative bioengineering-based treatments for complex heart rhythm disorders. As a bioengineer, Sanjiv Narayan also applies his background in neural networks, machine learning, and artificial intelligence to the field of cardiology at the Computational Arrhythmia Research Laboratory.

After extensive work that resulted in discovery of the role of focal drivers and rotors in heart fibrillation, Dr. Narayan coauthored a paper on what independent mapping techniques showed about the presence of rotational activation. The paper was published in the January 29, 2018, issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

The authors of the paper worked with the goal of finding out how, during the process of ablation, atrial fibrillation terminates close to the pulmonary veins prior to pulmonary vein isolation. This research represents the first full study of that phenomenon, as well as the first study of how patients with pulmonary vein reconnection can be free of arrhythmias.

The study involved patients with atrial fibrillation who had been scheduled for ablation. The researchers examined specific electrograms from these patients using two distinct mapping methods. In all patients studied, ablation at locations close to the pulmonary veins resulted in a termination of atrial fibrillation before the isolation of the pulmonary veins.

The researchers concluded that surgeons may be able to use these mapping techniques to create pulmonary vein lesion groups and lessen the occurrence of atrial fibrillation.

Studying Atrial Fibrillation Terminated by Local Ablation

Atrial Flutter pic
Atrial Fibrillation
Image: webmd.com

An experienced researcher specializing in atrial fibrillation, Dr. Sanjiv M. Narayan, professor of medicine at Stanford University, is responsible for developing innovative assessment tools for diagnosing heart arrhythmia conditions. Dr. Sanjiv M. Narayan’s research recently focused on the mechanisms of and relationship between localized ablation and persistent atrial fibrillation termination.

As part of a clinical trial, researchers hypothesized that local ablation sites where AF persistently terminates have certain indicators that can be analyzed through activation mapping techniques. To test this theory, they closely studied activation patterns that occurred solely in instances of AF termination via ablation.

After examining the results, the research team found patterns of either rotational or focal activity when mapping termination sites. Computer simulations also revealed rotational activation sequences, but the sequences were found to have increased sensitivity to activation timing, especially in areas where slow conduction was a factor. Based on these observations, the researchers stated that many currently used tools to map AF may not detect important regions, including sites of termination, and further studies should compare mapping approaches to guide ablation.